SURF | SNOW | SUN

Four Days on the AT, and Feeling Good

Hello from Georgia! It’s the end of my fourth day on the AT, and I am feeling good. Feet are tired, but there’s nothing hurting right now. Plus, Tiger Balm and rolling out my feet with a spiky plastic ball in the evenings has been helping. Here’s a recap of the past four days.
Day One: Saturday, March 30
My train arrived about two hours late to Gainesville, but I was able to sleep for a few hours on the ride. ...

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Is Quitting the Same as Failing?

In June 2015, I quit hiking the Appalachian Trail. I know a bunch of other people who quit too. Some of them quit before me, some after, all for different reasons. Some of us have moved on and some others were so crushed by their failure that it has been hard to recover. And to this, I beg the questions:
Is quitting the same as failing? Always? Or only sometimes? What constitutes failure?
When we set goals for ourselves, ...

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Beaver Valley Banked Slalom Recap

Photos by Chris Fitzsimmons & Lauren Francis Now seven year’s young, the Beaver Valley Banked Slalom has become the annual spring gathering of Ontario’s snowboard community. Capped at 250 entrants, the banked race is always a sold-out affair featuring a cool mix of legendary shreds, alongside some of the biggest names in park and street; industry […]

The post Beaver Valley Banked Slalom Recap appeared first on Snowboard Canada Magazine.

Hitch-hiking on Bolivia’s “Death Road” and through the Rainforest

Hitchhiking through Bolivia may not be the brightest idea but doing it on the death road, one of the most dangerous roads in the world is purely crazy!

But this is exactly what I did one summer.

I travelled the road from Yolosa to Rurrenabaque on the back of freight trucks.

My travel companion was not entirely impressed by my idea of saving money. Never mind I thought - I was paying for everything else. We had no plans and no maps, we did not even know the names of the places we were about to visit!

We just wanted to hit the road and go with the flow. The strip between Yolosa and Yucomo is one of the most dangerous roads in the world. Part of it is called the “Death Road” and every word of it is true.

The road is no wider than 3,2 meters, unpaved and on average 100 people die on it each year. The worst accident occurred in 1983 when a truck slipped into a steep roadside gorge killing 100 people at once.

Leaving La Paz

We left La Paz in the afternoon one sunny day. The ticket cost 10 bolivianos each, about a quid to Yolosa, 4 hours from La Paz. We waited until the last minute to buy the tickets. One gets a better deal just minutes before the bus leaves. That's because the drivers want to fill the last remaining places with passengers. The bus did not look very promising, rather like a vehicle destined for scrap but we hoped for the best. I prayed to God to keep driver awake as we descended over 3,000 meters from the capital to the Bolivian rainforest.

After about an hour our hearts started to beat slower as the altitude sickness was wearing off. This was the first sign of our descend to the valley of death. On the side of the road crosses left by family members were reminders of where we were. As the bus carried on flying us down to the valley the view was becoming ever more exotic. Lush forests carpeted the hillsides and a myriad of waterfalls showered down under the road as we crossed over bridges and drove through countless tunnels. From the arid and oxygen poor heights of La Paz we arrived to the abundance of water and fresh air!

The Hotel for the Night

We got off the bus just before sunset and made our way on foot to the next hotel which was about 2 hours walk away. The road was very quiet after sunset as no-one dares to drive on it at night. There are no signs and railings indicating the edge of the road: it is VERY easy to fall. We reached the hotel just after the restaurant closed so we had to make do with the bread we brought with us and put ourselves away for next day’s adventure. The picture in the gallery is of the "hotel".

Stopping the First Truck

The following morning we decided to walk a couple of hours to immerse ourselves in the beauty of the countryside and to listen to the birds’ singing. The only other time I heard voices like that was when I used my computer to make funny noises when I clicked on something. Although the scenery was wonderful and the birds were singing beautifully, each time a truck passed the dust almost made us suffocate.

When we could not cope with the dust any more I waved off the first truck coming. The driver was kind enough to stop for us - first time lucky! I asked if he would take us, and he asked where to, to which I said “until you stop”.

He said he would takes us to a place but the truck was so noisy I did not understand its name! So we just got on the back of the truck without knowing where we were actually going. Only hours later did we find out from the other indigenous travellers with whom we shared the back of the truck that we were going to Caranavi.

Caranavi and a Tasty Lunch

It was a four hour ride on the back of the truck, the first time for my Chilean friend, the second for me. I did something barely comparable once before in Romania, although that was nothing in likeness to what we were doing in Bolivia. The road was absolutely horrendous and the truck was shaking the soul out of us both. We jumped every time it drove into a pothole or sprung on a rock - but we loved every minute of our adventure!

Our ride arrived to Caranavi at noon, just on time for lunch. The other travellers warned us to take care of ourselves in this town because there is a lot of crime and robbery. I hid my valuables to a safe place in my rucksack and looked for somewhere to eat.

In contrast to her forecast, no danger ensued - everybody seemed helpful and friendly. They sold us bread at the local rate and we had lunch in one of the cheap restaurants with the locals. I am sure they did not overcharge us because we sat at the same table with other locals and they paid the same as us. So in the end not only did they not rob us of our valuables but we were also dealt fairly and squarely.

Hitching the Second Ride - Almost to Death

After lunch we made our way to the end of town and asked truckers to take us. Unfortunately none of them wanted to as they were travelling with family members. In the end we had to walk for the second time that day. For hours only taxis passed us and we were giving up hope that we would get anywhere close to a town that day. But then we spotted a police checkpoint just when we started to contemplate taking the expensive option and get into a taxi. At each checkpoint truckers wait to be inspected and one of them here offered to take us to the next town. It almost proved to be a deadly ride for us.

By then it was raining heavily and not only our clothes got soaking wet but the road underneath the truck as well. The mud made it very slippery and dangerous to drive on but it did not seem to bother the driver. He was driving at a good 30-40 miles an hour in the deadliest hairpin turns.

His carelessness paid dividends: when a bus came unnoticed from the other direction he had to pull off to the side quickly and he lost control. The truck slipped and only our luck saved us. A big rock stopped the wheel slipping any further and we could quickly get off the back where we travelled with a load of bricks.

Saving the Truck

We spent the next two hours putting rocks in front of the wheels to stop the truck slipping any further. We begged other drivers to stop and pull us out but none wanted to help their fellow trucker. At this point we began to worry that the heavier rain would wash the truck into the ravine. But then we got lucky because just before darkness fell one big lorry stopped and pulled our vehicle to safety so we could carry on to the next check point.

There the driver told us it would be better for us if we got in a bus for the night because it can get pretty cold during the late hours.  We took his advice and after dinner with him we parted and waited for a bus. The next bus came an hour later and following some haggling he promised to take us to Rurrenabaque, a jungle “resort” for foreigners heading to the Wadidi National Park.

This was a slightly more comfortable bus so our hitch-hiking challenge ended in style. 

Country: 

Hitch-hiking on Bolivia’s “Death Road” and through the Rainforest

Hitchhiking through Bolivia may not be the brightest idea but doing it on the death road, one of the most dangerous roads in the world is purely crazy!

But this is exactly what I did one summer.

I travelled the road from Yolosa to Rurrenabaque on the back of freight trucks.

My travel companion was not entirely impressed by my idea of saving money. Never mind I thought - I was paying for everything else. We had no plans and no maps, we did not even know the names of the places we were about to visit!

We just wanted to hit the road and go with the flow. The strip between Yolosa and Yucomo is one of the most dangerous roads in the world. Part of it is called the “Death Road” and every word of it is true.

The road is no wider than 3,2 meters, unpaved and on average 100 people die on it each year. The worst accident occurred in 1983 when a truck slipped into a steep roadside gorge killing 100 people at once.

Leaving La Paz

We left La Paz in the afternoon one sunny day. The ticket cost 10 bolivianos each, about a quid to Yolosa, 4 hours from La Paz. We waited until the last minute to buy the tickets. One gets a better deal just minutes before the bus leaves. That's because the drivers want to fill the last remaining places with passengers. The bus did not look very promising, rather like a vehicle destined for scrap but we hoped for the best. I prayed to God to keep driver awake as we descended over 3,000 meters from the capital to the Bolivian rainforest.

After about an hour our hearts started to beat slower as the altitude sickness was wearing off. This was the first sign of our descend to the valley of death. On the side of the road crosses left by family members were reminders of where we were. As the bus carried on flying us down to the valley the view was becoming ever more exotic. Lush forests carpeted the hillsides and a myriad of waterfalls showered down under the road as we crossed over bridges and drove through countless tunnels. From the arid and oxygen poor heights of La Paz we arrived to the abundance of water and fresh air!

The Hotel for the Night

We got off the bus just before sunset and made our way on foot to the next hotel which was about 2 hours walk away. The road was very quiet after sunset as no-one dares to drive on it at night. There are no signs and railings indicating the edge of the road: it is VERY easy to fall. We reached the hotel just after the restaurant closed so we had to make do with the bread we brought with us and put ourselves away for next day’s adventure. The picture in the gallery is of the "hotel".

Stopping the First Truck

The following morning we decided to walk a couple of hours to immerse ourselves in the beauty of the countryside and to listen to the birds’ singing. The only other time I heard voices like that was when I used my computer to make funny noises when I clicked on something. Although the scenery was wonderful and the birds were singing beautifully, each time a truck passed the dust almost made us suffocate.

When we could not cope with the dust any more I waved off the first truck coming. The driver was kind enough to stop for us - first time lucky! I asked if he would take us, and he asked where to, to which I said “until you stop”.

He said he would takes us to a place but the truck was so noisy I did not understand its name! So we just got on the back of the truck without knowing where we were actually going. Only hours later did we find out from the other indigenous travellers with whom we shared the back of the truck that we were going to Caranavi.

Caranavi and a Tasty Lunch

It was a four hour ride on the back of the truck, the first time for my Chilean friend, the second for me. I did something barely comparable once before in Romania, although that was nothing in likeness to what we were doing in Bolivia. The road was absolutely horrendous and the truck was shaking the soul out of us both. We jumped every time it drove into a pothole or sprung on a rock - but we loved every minute of our adventure!

Our ride arrived to Caranavi at noon, just on time for lunch. The other travellers warned us to take care of ourselves in this town because there is a lot of crime and robbery. I hid my valuables to a safe place in my rucksack and looked for somewhere to eat.

In contrast to her forecast, no danger ensued - everybody seemed helpful and friendly. They sold us bread at the local rate and we had lunch in one of the cheap restaurants with the locals. I am sure they did not overcharge us because we sat at the same table with other locals and they paid the same as us. So in the end not only did they not rob us of our valuables but we were also dealt fairly and squarely.

Hitching the Second Ride - Almost to Death

After lunch we made our way to the end of town and asked truckers to take us. Unfortunately none of them wanted to as they were travelling with family members. In the end we had to walk for the second time that day. For hours only taxis passed us and we were giving up hope that we would get anywhere close to a town that day. But then we spotted a police checkpoint just when we started to contemplate taking the expensive option and get into a taxi. At each checkpoint truckers wait to be inspected and one of them here offered to take us to the next town. It almost proved to be a deadly ride for us.

By then it was raining heavily and not only our clothes got soaking wet but the road underneath the truck as well. The mud made it very slippery and dangerous to drive on but it did not seem to bother the driver. He was driving at a good 30-40 miles an hour in the deadliest hairpin turns.

His carelessness paid dividends: when a bus came unnoticed from the other direction he had to pull off to the side quickly and he lost control. The truck slipped and only our luck saved us. A big rock stopped the wheel slipping any further and we could quickly get off the back where we travelled with a load of bricks.

Saving the Truck

We spent the next two hours putting rocks in front of the wheels to stop the truck slipping any further. We begged other drivers to stop and pull us out but none wanted to help their fellow trucker. At this point we began to worry that the heavier rain would wash the truck into the ravine. But then we got lucky because just before darkness fell one big lorry stopped and pulled our vehicle to safety so we could carry on to the next check point.

There the driver told us it would be better for us if we got in a bus for the night because it can get pretty cold during the late hours.  We took his advice and after dinner with him we parted and waited for a bus. The next bus came an hour later and following some haggling he promised to take us to Rurrenabaque, a jungle “resort” for foreigners heading to the Wadidi National Park.

This was a slightly more comfortable bus so our hitch-hiking challenge ended in style. 

Country: 

The Dazzling Story Behind the Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel tower is one of the most famous icons in the world. It's the crown jewel of France and is one of the leading drivers of French tourism.

It's also one of the architectural wonders of the world.

For almost forty years it stood as the tallest man made structure in the world. Its bright lights in the evenings make it a stunning sight to witness.

 

Here are some facts and figures making up the story of the Eiffel tower:

Why was the Eiffel Tower Built?

There are many historical reasons why this magnificent structure was built. The most well-known and the true reason is that it was built to cheer up the world exhibition commemorating the 100 year anniversary of the French revolution. The French revolution is a very important event in French history, as it was responsible for abolishing dictatorship and welcoming in democracy.

The French people and officials wanted to remember the 100 year anniversary by doing something different for their country. They wanted to improve the quality of life in Paris and all over France. Many suggestions were given suggesting that the country build a new and beautiful building to commemorate the anniversary.  A number of designers, engineers and architects presented their designs ideas. Among them, the design of Gustavo Eiffel was selected as the winner. It was opposed by many people, but with the determination of Eiffel the design won out.

Another reason it was built was due to the promising nature of its design. The height of the Eiffel tower allowed for practical experiments related to air pressure, temperature and radio telegraphy. In fact, the major reason for its design was so that it could be used as a radio transmission tower. After the expiration of its first lease, many people wanted to demolish it, but politicians wanted to retain it for radio transmission.

One of the other reasons that the Eiffel Tower was built was to create a history that illustrated the purpose of the Paris Exposition.  During this time, the Eiffel Tower would have been the tallest building in the entire world. This swayed many leaders in France to choose this design over others and ultimately erect the building as it stands today.

 

Designing and Construction of the Eiffel tower:

The construction of the Eiffel Tower involved tremendous effort from the Eiffel and with his companions; Maurice Koechlin (a structural expert) and many other metal experts. After much debate, the final design was ready. It involved 18,000 pieces of puddle iron, a kind of wrought iron used in construction, and 2.5 million rivets. More than 500 workers worked for 2 years to assemble the framework of this iconic tower.  At the end, it stood at a height of 10,000 feet and was the tallest building in the world (though this is no longer the case).

 

Parisians Reaction to the Great tower:

Initially, many Parisians literally hated the tower. They considered it to be structurally unsound and an eyesore in their city. The famous novelist Guy de Maupassant hated it so much that he wanted to avoid seeing the tower and would therefore dine at the restaurant in the Eiffel Tower so that he could avoid looking at it directly. 

 

What is the Eiffel Tower Today?

The Eiffel Tower is now the most important landmark in France. It has become a permanent feature of the Paris skyline.  A major part of Paris' revenue is generated by tourism geared towards visiting the Eiffel Tower.  Many people from many parts of the world come to see it and it's become commonly referred to as the Tower of Love. 

The scenic beauty from the top is enough to drive you mad. A trip to the Eiffel Tower is something that you'll remember for the rest of your life!

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The Sulfur Miners of Mount Ijen

In the summer over 4,000 people visit the Mount Ijen, a volcano mountain on the island of Java in Indonesia, during the night to see the "Blue Fire". A fire that is the result of the highly toxic sulfur that is a rich resource in this volcano crater.

Not only night photography can be interesting to pursue there, but also the day has a lot to offer for us photographers.

I spent 5 weeks with a local family in a small village and want to share my experience of documenting the sulfur miners and share some tips if you are interested in a trip there yourself.

 

About Mt. Ijen

Location of Mt. Ijen

The Mt. Ijen is on the far east side of the island Java. The biggest city near the Mt. Ijen is Banyuwangi, roughly 1 1/2 hour driving distance from the city center. Java is also home to the capital Jakarta and other bigger cities like Yogyakarta and Surabaya.

There are multiple options to visit Mt Ijen depending if you come from the west or east. If You have been in Jakarta and are interested in more impressions of Java, then a road-trip might be the right choice for you to visit all the other points of interest. Coming from the west a stay in Bondowoso might be recommended, although the trip to Ijen is significantly longer.

Other options include flying to the airport of Banyuwangi from Jakarta, or if you are in Bali, using the ferry to reach Banyuwangi. Bali is only a few hours away from Mount Ijen, so if you want to have a short change in perspective, leaving Bali for a day or two to visit Mount Ijen can be an option for you.

Nearby is also the Mountain Raung, which might be more interesting if you are looking for interesting hiking tracks.

 

Staying near Mt. Ijen

The City of Banyuwangi is roughly a 1 1/2 hours car drive away from the base camp of Mount Ijen. Personally, I found that distance to be too long and preferred a rather short drive.

Instead of staying in the city, there are a lot of homestays or smaller Inns that also have great services for people visiting the mountain. I had the lovely opportunity to stay with a local family for 5 weeks so that I could visit the mountain multiple times.

The advantage is, that you are staying with a local family that can provide the best service for visiting the mountain. Tourism is a big economic driver nowadays and a lot of families that were sulfur miners themselves, working every day in the crater of the mountain, now serve as tourist guides.

Of course staying in a small village in the Indonesian jungle doesn't offer the luxury of a 5-star hotel, but you can experience the local life and the people are more than welcome to any foreigners.

So my tip would be to search for a homestay near the city Licin and take a tour to the mountain from there - check out a few options here.

 

Attraction of Ijen during the Day

I'd say 90% of tourists come during the night because they want to see the "Blue Fire". Which is fair, it is a really beautiful attraction, but I believe that the Mount Ijen also has its attractive side during the day.

You are able to oversee the crater and all its surroundings, spectating the workers and the sea. The nature is on the one hand very beautiful, but also very surreal at this volcano. Looking at the sea it looks like one of those interesting places where you just want to jump right in and cooldown after a long walk to the crater.

In reality, you wouldn't survive swimming there for very long. The sulfur also made the water highly toxic and swimming obviously wouldn't be a great idea. Same applies to the "fog" which is often highly toxic sulfur smoke as well. Gas masks are mandatory for this trip, but at least the sulfur is noticeable due to its strong smell and less likely to be confused with harmless fog.

 

Hiking to the Top

From the "Basecamp" it is about a 1 1/2 hours hike to the top of the crater. Be aware though, that there are some very steep passages that require some basic physical fitness. By no means, is it a hike that you should take if you are injured, ill, or simply don't feel like in the physical constitution for this effort.

On the other hand, there is no age restriction and basically, anyone can make it to the top. There are places you can rest on the way and after around an hour, there is also a Warung that sells soft drinks, sweets or water. Be aware though, that the opening hours can be very sporadic, so it is recommended to carry some food and water yourself.

In any case, I would recommend taking a local tour guide that leads you to the top. Often times gas masks are needed, which the guides can provide. Their level of English is very basic but communication shouldn't be an issue.

After you have arrived at the top of the crater, you have the choice of going down to the ground level and witness the sulfur yourself. This is where the fun for me begins, but also the more exhausting part.

Going down the crater requires even more physical attention. If you think that the hike was already too tiring, then I would refrain from going inside the crater. There are no handrails, no clear path, and one simple misstep can cause a very serious accident.

It is no joke that there is this sign at the top, trying to prevent any tourist from going any further.

 

Photographing the Sulfur Miners

My goal as a photographer was to document one of the hardest jobs on this planet. The miners, working in the crater carry around 70kg of sulfur from the bottom of the crater to the top.

They don't do this ascent to the top once, but up to 4 times a day, bringing home more than 200kg of sulfur. They can make up to 500$ a month with this straining job, which might not sound a lot for a job that is very dangerous to their health, but in Indonesia, this is already a good amount of money to support a family.

Photographing the Sulfur miners itself is pretty easy. They are hard-working people but in general also very open to the tourists. Keep in mind though, that you are in their working space. Therefore you should respect their work and not get in their way while descending yourself.

This can be a difficult task at times because the path is so narrow that there isn't any space for two people. Then it is just better for you to back off and let the miners pass.

Of course, with 70kg resting on your shoulder, you wouldn't want to wait for some tourist either, so they always should have the right of way.

While they also don't request any money for the photos, some of them sell goods made out of sulfur. If you want to support them, you might consider taking home a sulfur souvenir.

The descent takes around 30 to 45 minutes depending on how busy the path is and in which direction the wind blows the sulfur smoke. It is advisable to test the gas mask beforehand to make sure you are ready to handle it correctly when needed.

On your way down, You can find different places that just invite you to rest for a minute and take some pictures of the scenery.

Once you are on the ground level of the crater, you can either go to the left, where the sulfur pipes are, blowing the smoke into the air, or you can go to the right side to get close to were the miners actually get the sulfur. Make sure to talk with your guide beforehand where you want to go.

Getting close to the actual mining should be very carefully considered. My guide didn't want me to go there because of the dangers involved. The smoke burns your eyes and the gas-mask doesn't protect you 100% from the harm of the smoke.

At the mining ground, the worker will also ask for a small fee if you want to photograph there for the team. It is a fair game since they try to get you as close as possible and show you how they work, so I didn't mind paying some little extra.

Once you captured your images, you can begin the ascent again and have a look at your photographs and this surreal place from the safety of your home.

 

Gear Advice

I didn't mind too much about my gear as I see it as working equipment. But be aware that there is a lot of smoke. I wouldn't advise changing any lens when being near the crater because the smoke and dust will only harm your sensor.

Therefore take one lens with you that you want to use and don't change lenses.

A UV-filter will protect your lens from the dust and minor rubble or scratches. Keep a cleaning tissue with you, just in case you want to clean the LCD-screen or just the camera itself.

After going to the Mount Ijen, all my clothes were covered in sulfur dust and so was my camera. The FujiX100F that I used was very fine with it though and didn't make any trouble. If you are afraid of your super expensive gear, consider going there with a smaller camera first and evaluate yourself if your gear can withstand the smoke.

All in all, it was a memory for life to be there and photograph and if you are in Bali or Indonesia, you should see that impressive crater yourself. Meet local people and dive into a whole other world, that you would never see otherwise.

 

Travel tip shared by Sebastian
streetbounty.com

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Guide to Backpacking by Motorbike

Searching for the location, checking the motorbike or preparing enough money is some of what you need to do before the backpacking trip.

 

Backpacking by motorbike is not too difficult, especially when you prepared the plan. Here are some experiences.

Guide to backpacking by motorbike

Research the roads

First, you need to know about the location you will drive to. Using Google Maps to test and measure distances and asking someone who knows about the place are good ideas. Doing this helps you understand the routes with bad roads and prepare for the journey to be more careful. For example, you should avoid highway 1A – where there are some of parts under construction, bad roads and traffic jam.

Google Maps can display any roads you might drive past in detail.

 

Checking and maintenance of motorcycle

Before you go, you should take your motorcycle to check tires, chain gear, bearings and change oil. If any parts have problems, you need to replace them immediately. From experience, being stuck on the side of the road with the broken motorcycle is the worst.

 

Packing right

Calculating how many days you will travel to bring suitable clothing is also important. For example, a pair of pants can be worn for two days but with shirts you need to change every day to ensure sanitation. Note that clothes must be comfortable, a little loose and durable. Backpacks used should be large and able to hold many items.

 

Protective clothes

  • Raincoats: This item is essential but often missed. The most convenient one is the raincoat including pants and shirt, avoid buying batwing type ones.

  • Protective clothes: One of the most common protective items is gloves. You can buy them online with prices ranging from 500,000 to 600,000 dong/pair. In addition, the helmet should be used as a full-face type (covering the entire face) or at least the one covering 3/4 of the face. Note the use of normal helmets should be restricted because it is easily overturned due to strong winds and you might suffer from tinnitus while driving.

  • Dustproof glasses: You should buy large glasses or use safety goggles to prevent dust and wind causing dryness and redness. Normal sunglasses are mainly used to drive in the city.

  • Shoes: When driving, you should wear shoes that help you easily control the brakes. Additionally, you can prepare a pair of rainproof shoe covers to ensure safety in all weather conditions.

 

Food

The list will include cakes and drinks. When you give your legs a break, you should eat in order to charge energy to always keep your body in good condition and alert.

 

Finance

  • Gasoline: You'll need to budget gasoline per person. For motorcycles, you can calculate a liter of petrol to run an expected number of kilometers. For example, if driving 40 km will consume a liter of gasoline, the amount of depreciation deducted will be 30 - 35 km/ liter.

  • Eating: Budget how much you expect to be eating along your journey.

  • Accommodation: For the hotel, the cost is about 150,000-200,000 VND per night.

  • Total: Cost of food a day in combination with the hotel will fall about 300,000 dong, with the extra costs incurred (if any) of 50,000 and gas money. You can estimate the average budget per day and then multiply the number of days in the journey to know the total amount to prepare.

 

Mental preparation

It is also important. You should anticipate the worst situations like broken motorbike, rainy days, running out of gas or other unexpected problems. Once you prepare well, when the bad situations unfortunately happen, you are calm enough to figure out the way to solve the problems. In case it happens in reality, you just assume that it is the experience you get after the trip. There is no need to think too negatively.

 

On the road

You should drive within the allowable speed limit. Before passing the truck, if the road does not have dedicated lane for motorcycles, you will have to turn left, turn on signal and honk. Be aware of all of the road rules.

 

Time

Because you are backpacking, you will likely have more time to stop and take pictures or sightsee the landscapes. So, it is necessary to calculate the time properly if you do not want to arrive in the place so late.

 

There may be some tension, but after each journey, you will have many exciting experiences to look back on.

Backpacking helps you have more time and a feeling of freedom, but sometimes, it will give you sense of unsafety on the road. That's why it is extremely important to prepare well and know what you are getting yourself in for.

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